YA in the Second City

Blogging about young adult life & literature since 2011

Sep 19
Currently ReadingThe Boy Who Couldn’t Sleep and Never Had To by DC Pierson
Whenever I finish reading a truly wonderful book, such as The Night Circus, it’s always that much more difficult to decide what to read next. This time around, I decided to segue into reading the 2011 Alex Award winners – “ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults, ages 12 through 18. The winning titles are selected from the previous year’s publishing.”
I’ve been planning to read the Alex Award winners for a while, mostly because I’m interested in what the novels do and do not have in common and why each was thought to have “special appeal” to the #yalit crowd. It’s a list ripe for examination given my broader interest in how #yalit is defined as a genre and the implications of those definitions, and I’m excited to get started.
In particular, the transition from reading books that are obviously #yalit to reading some that are less so now feels smooth, because I read The Night Circus with the Alex Awards already in mind. (I think it’s a shoo-in for the 2012 list.)
Anyway, the award winners are listed alphabetically by title, making DC Pierson’s the first in 2011. I’m 8% in as of today, and my main thought so far has been, Why wasn’t this billed as #yalit from the start?

Currently Reading
The Boy Who Couldn’t Sleep and Never Had To by DC Pierson

Whenever I finish reading a truly wonderful book, such as The Night Circus, it’s always that much more difficult to decide what to read next. This time around, I decided to segue into reading the 2011 Alex Award winners – “ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults, ages 12 through 18. The winning titles are selected from the previous year’s publishing.”

I’ve been planning to read the Alex Award winners for a while, mostly because I’m interested in what the novels do and do not have in common and why each was thought to have “special appeal” to the #yalit crowd. It’s a list ripe for examination given my broader interest in how #yalit is defined as a genre and the implications of those definitions, and I’m excited to get started.

In particular, the transition from reading books that are obviously #yalit to reading some that are less so now feels smooth, because I read The Night Circus with the Alex Awards already in mind. (I think it’s a shoo-in for the 2012 list.)

Anyway, the award winners are listed alphabetically by title, making DC Pierson’s the first in 2011. I’m 8% in as of today, and my main thought so far has been, Why wasn’t this billed as #yalit from the start?


  1. cabbagemodel420 reblogged this from coolestpriest
  2. coolestpriest reblogged this from coolestpriest
  3. yaininthesecondcity posted this